Ukrainian Canadian Congress

Pre-Election Policy Brochure


The Ukrainian Canadian Congress would like
to know where you stand on these important
issues...

The Ukrainian Canadian Congress ("UCC") is an umbrella organization representing the Ukrainian Canadian community before the people and Government of Canada. There are presently over one million Canadians of Ukrainian descent in Canada.

The UCC kindly requests that you send your response to the following seven questions by e-mail (elections@ucc.ca) or fax (204-947-3882) by November 17, 2000. We will publish the results to assist Canadians in learning where you stand on these important issues. Lack of response will be considered as "lack of interest" and will be registered accordingly.


1.

The UCC believes that legislation dealing with citizenship must ensure that the revocation or annulment of this right is decided by Canadian courts and provide for full appeal rights.

All Canadian citizens, whether or not born in Canada, are entitled to the same rights and subject to the same obligations.

Throughout our history, Canada has opened its doors to the people of the world who were looking for a tolerant and free society, based on democratic principles. As a result, Canada stands proudly on the world stage as the best place to live, work and raise a family.

During the last Parliament, the Government of Canada introduced Bill C-16, the Citizenship of Canada Act, to bring the processes related to citizenship into the 21st century. However, some of the core values of our judicial system to guarantee fairness and justice for all Canadians were missing in this Bill.

In its presentations to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration, and the Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs, the UCC stressed the need for ensuring that the basic democratic and judicial systems, which have evolved in Canada, be clearly established in the legislation.

The UCC advanced amendments in order:

  a)

to ensure due process before the courts for naturalized Canadians in cases of revocation and annulment of citizenship, including full appeal rights;

  b)

to insert a limitation period of five years for the commencement of revocation of citizenship proceedings;

  c)

to modify the standard of proof in revocation and annulment of citizenship proceedings from a "balance of probabilities" to "beyond a reasonable doubt"; and

  d)

to ensure that a permanent Canadian resident can submit to the courts for review an order or declaration of the Governor in Council prohibiting such person to obtain Canadian citizenship.

 

The UCC wishes to ensure that legislation dealing with citizenship is fair and just for all Canadians.

Do you agree with UCC's position concerning citizenship?
Yes   No  


2.

The UCC believes that the Canadian Government should not resort to denaturalization and deportation proceedings to deal with the issue of Canadians suspected of war crimes during the Second World War.

In its report to the Government, the Deschênes Commission concluded that the process of denaturalization and deportation "does not really deal with the substantive issue of war crimes: it merely transfers the suspect to another country". As such, denaturalization and deportation proceedings against individuals suspected of WWII crimes are contrary to the spirit of Canada's new Crimes Against Humanity and War Crimes Act and:

  a)

they are inadequate to determine a person's guilt or innocence as a war criminal;

  b)

they suppose that another country will address this issue in Canada's place; and

  c)

evidence for denaturalization and deportation proceedings has become largely unavailable, as applications for immigration documents have been destroyed in large numbers over the years by government employees and the admission into Canada of many post WWII immigrants was discretionary.

 

The UCC also believes that the Government of Canada should prosecute Canadian citizens, who are seriously suspected of WWII war crimes, before Canadian courts of criminal jurisdiction in accordance with Canadian criminal law and Canadian standards of evidence in criminal proceedings.

Do you agree with UCC's position concerning denaturalization and deportation proceedings?
Yes   No  


3.

The UCC believes that legislation dealing with immigration should provide for full judicial review and recognize in its objectives the multicultural character of Canada.

During the last Parliament, the Government of Canada introduced Bill C-31, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, as a reform that would "strike a balance between strengthened enforcement measures to prevent abuse and our clear need to attract more skilled workers, speed up family reunification and honour our humanitarian tradition of offering safe haven to those truly in need of protection". The intent is commendable. However, Bill C-31 did not recognize in its objectives Canada's multicultural reality and did not provide a basis for ensuring a fair and just process.

According to the UCC, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act should:

  a)

recognize in its objectives the multicultural character of Canada;

  b)

guarantee to permanent residents the right of entry into Canada until an inland determination of loss of such status is made, with full appeal rights;

  c)

provide for full judicial review of determinations under the Act; and

  d)

provide that permanent residents and refugee claimants may only be removed after judicial review is completed.

 

Balance, fairness and transparency are the key elements to a sound Canadian immigration policy for the 21st century.

Do you agree with UCC's position concerning immigration?
Yes   No  


4.

The UCC believes that the Government of Canada should provide redress to the Ukrainian Canadian community for the injustices committed during Canada's first national internment operations of 1914-20.

 

On September 27, 1991, the House of Commons unanimously approved a Private Member's Motion sponsored by Mr. Peter Milliken, Member of Parliament for Kingston and the Islands. The motion, in part, stated:

   

acknowledge that the internment, disenfranchisement and related repressive measures taken against Canadians of Ukrainian origin between 1914 and 1920 were unwarranted and unjust and contrary to the principles

   

"That, in the opinion of this House, the government should:

  1)

acknowledge that the internment, disenfranchisement and related repressive measures taken against Canadians of Ukrainian origin between 1914 and 1920 were unwarranted and unjust and contrary to the principles now adopted and reflected in our Charter of Rights and Freedoms; [...]

  2)

undertake negotiations with ... the Ukrainian Canadian Congress on the question of redress to the community."

 

On June 8, 1993, the then Leader of the Opposition, the Right Honourable Jean Chrétien, wrote to the UCC on the issue of redress for internment operations and declared:

   

"The Liberal Party understands your concern. As you know, we support your efforts to secure the redress of Ukrainian-Canadians' claims arising from their internment and loss of freedoms during the First World War and interwar period. You can be assured that we will continue to monitor the situation closely and seek to ensure that the government honours its promise".

Do you agree with UCC's position concerning redress to the Ukrainian Canadian community?
Yes   No  


5.

The UCC believes in a federally funded all-inclusive Canadian Genocide Museum in Ottawa.

The UCC believes that a museum dedicated to the victims of all genocides would be a noble and dignified way for Canada to demonstrate to Canadian citizens and to the international community that Canada condemns genocides. A Canadian Genocide Museum would also provide for an equitable recognition of all victims of genocides, irrespective of where and against whom the atrocities were committed. In addition, such a museum would sensitize future generations by disseminating information about such mass atrocities to ensure that similar horrors are never repeated. As an educational tool, the museum would have no equal. A Canadian Genocide Museum would be an original and uniquely Canadian endeavour.

The UCC urges the Federal Government to establish a Canadian Genocide Museum in Ottawa to honour the victims of all genocides.

Do you agree with UCC's position concerning a Canadian Genocide Museum?
Yes   No  


6.

The UCC believes that it is important for Canada to have a strong policy on multiculturalism based on cultural pluralism.

Canada's multiculturalism policy should ensure that all Canadian cultures are provided with equal opportunity to realize their full potential, which includes equal access to government institutions and programs that support education, communications, culture, arts and community development. Cultural diversity encourages the full integration of ethnocultural communities into Canadian society.

Do you agree with UCC's position concerning multiculturalism?
Yes   No  


7.

The UCC believes that Canada should strengthen its "special relationship" with Ukraine by promoting and developing programs and policies for the mutual benefit of both countries.

Canada was the first western democracy in 1991 to recognize an independent Ukraine. Since then, Canadians have provided support in developing an economic and social framework for Ukraine. These efforts have emanated from government and non-government bodies.

Ukraine, with a population of 50 million and a territory the size of France, is at a crossroads. Nearly 10 years after the breakup of the Soviet Union, Ukraine sits precariously on the border between integration with Europe and dependency on Russia. An economy torn between state control and a free market has many Ukrainians concerned about their future.

It is in Canada's interest to play a leading role in ensuring that Ukraine accelerates economic reforms and further integrates with western democracies.

Do you agree with UCC's position concerning the strengthening of Canada's "special relationship" with Ukraine?
Yes   No  


Thank you for your time.
We look forward to your response by
November 17, 2000


Please send this page as your response by
November 17, 2000
to
Ukrainian Canadian Congress
E-mail: elections@ucc.ca
Fax: (204) 947-3882
Telephone: (204) 942-4627

1. Do you agree with UCC's position concerning citizenship? Yes   No  
2. Do you agree with UCC's position concerning denaturalization and deportation proceedings? Yes   No  
3. Do you agree with UCC's position concerning immigration? Yes   No  
4. Do you agree with UCC's position concerning redress to the Ukrainian Canadian community? Yes   No  
5. Do you agree with UCC's position concerning a Canadian Genocide Museum? Yes   No  
6. Do you agree with UCC's position concerning multiculturalism? Yes   No  
7. Do you agree with UCC's position concerning the strengthening of Canada's "special relationship" with Ukraine? Yes   No  

We encourage you to learn more about
the UCC and these important issues by visiting us at
www.ucc.ca

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©2000 Ukrainian Canadian Congress
456 Main Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3B 1B6
Tel: (204) 942-4627 Fax: (204) 947-3882
UCC E-mail: ucchq@istar.ca
WebMaster E-mail: www@ucc.ca

7 November 2000